News From All Corners

More Cable Companies Take TV Off Menu
By Shalini Ramachandran,The Wall Street Journal
A growing group of small cable-TV providers are realizing that both they and their customers can live without expensive TV channels. Of the 100 million homes in the U.S. that subscribe to pay TV, about 14% are served by smaller companies that have a million or fewer customers. In some cases, they serve fewer than 100. Faced with rising programming costs, some of those companies—such as Ringgold Telephone Co. in Georgia and BTC Broadband in Bixby, Okla.—have pulled the plug on TV service altogether, preferring to simply focus on Internet and phone service.
Traveler from Liberia is first Ebola patient diagnosed in U.S.
By Julie Steenhuysen and Sharon Begley, SRN News
(Reuters) – A man who flew from Liberia to Texas has become the first patient infected with the deadly Ebola virus to be diagnosed in the United States, health officials said on Tuesday, a sign the outbreak ravaging West Africa may spread globally. The patient sought treatment six days after arriving in Texas on Sept. 20, Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), told reporters. He was admitted two days later to an isolation room at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.
EBay to Spin Off PayPal in 2015
Reuters
EBay Inc (EBAY) said it would spin off PayPal, its fast-growing payments business, into a publicly traded company in the second half of 2015, marking an about-face for the company. The news of the tax-free spinoff to shareholders sent eBay's shares up 10 percent to $58.15 in premarket trading.

Blogosphere

Till Debt Do We Part?
By Ernest Liang
Graduating from college is meant to be an occasion to celebrate. Unfortunately for many graduates, it is also a somber reminder that it is time to pay back what they owe. According to the Wall Street Journal, the Class of 2014 is the most indebted class ever (“Congratulations to Class 2014, Most Indebted Ever” WSJ 5/16/2104). Over 70% of these graduates left school with student loans averaging a crushing $33,000. Student loans remain the fastest growing category (up over 360% since 2003) of U.S. household debt. Total U.S. household debt, on the other hand, grew 61% between 2003 and 2013 (“U.S. Household Debt Increases” WSJ 5/13/2014). According to one report (www.gobankingrates.com, 9/10/2013), the average American is more than $225,000 in debt with many having less than $500 in savings.
Integrity Squandered
By Douglas Gehrman
Integrity is almost a cliché among today’s leadership bromides. All leaders must possess this trait to be considered legitimate and credible, otherwise they won’t be trusted. Given the fact that integrity is such an import leadership requirement, why do so many company leaders, religious figures, politicians and military leaders fail to gain it? The truth is that given an irresistible temptation or a thirst for power, people are capable of almost anything. Human history is rife with examples, concentration camps in Auschwitz, gassing children in Syria, and to a lesser extent, the infamous fraud at Enron. A great number of personal failings never even make the headlines.
Who Are YOU Going to Listen To?
By Lane Kramer
Recently, I picked up a new car at an out of town dealership. The car came equipped with a GPS system. When it came time to drive back to Dallas, I punched in my home address and listened for the instructions on how to proceed. I did not have a physical map so I was completely dependent on an outside source of navigation to get home safely. Very soon a very nice, warm, and professional female voice came on line saying, “turn left on Jarus Street and proceed .5 mile and turn left on Highway 67”. I started to follow her instructions because she came from a very credible source- the manufacture’s GPS System. However, as I pulled on to Highway 67 I felt a check in my spirit. I remembered that two different CEO Institute Members said that the best way to get back to Dallas was to take Interstate 35.

The Legal Corner

Uber-Capitalists and Food Trucks
By T. Kyle Bryant
The Houston political scene has seen its share of hot-button issues lately. In June, I wrote about the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance (HERO), which the City Council passed in May. In the intervening months, the City has undergone a public debate concerning two separate industries and whether to allow certain forms of competition in the marketplace. First, there’s the restaurant industry’s battle with Mobile Food Units (food trucks). As anyone who has lived in Houston for a while knows, food trucks have become increasingly popular in the last five years or so. These culinary caravans hop from spot to spot serving up interesting and unique food choices—mostly dishes that you can serve in a plastic bowl or in a paper bag. Food trucks must be permitted, inspected, and follow similar health regulations as brick and mortar restaurants. They are also subject to other requirements but generally permitted to serve food wherever they want—except for downtown, which boasts a bustling daytime population and, therefore, an opportunity for increased revenue for the food trucks.
The Increasing Vulnerability of Religious Liberty
By John Oliver Tyler
Two recent legal developments significantly impact Constitutional liberties. The first is the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision. The second is John Boehner's decision to sue Obama. Like Ulysses' Trojan horse, both developments appear to be victories for liberty. Beneath their surface, however, both developments carry significant threats to liberty, particularly religious liberty.

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